Alexander Nordin interned at the Goodhill Group at the University of Queensland, where he and his coworkers focused on brain processing research
Alexander in Brisbane

Brain processing in times of growth

Alex Nordin interned with the Goodhill Group at the University of Queensland where he and his coworkers focused on better understanding how brains process information, especially during growth. “This includes how growing nerve fibers (axons) use molecular cues to make guidance decisions, how map-like representations of visual inputs form in the optic tectum and visual cortex and how spontaneous activity develops in the brain,” Alex explains. “They use a combination of experimental, mathematical and computational techniques.”

Through MISTI I was immersed in a new country with a new project and with endless opportunities available to me.

A positive experience

Prior to Alex’s arrival, the lab published a paper on the spatial relationships between neurons in the zebrafish brain. To further understand the relationships in the zebrafish brain, Alex’s job was to discover if a temporal relationship exists among neurons in the zebrafish brain. “I concluded that there is no temporal relationship in the data. Despite the negative result, the process of research was a positive experience,” Alex says.

  • Australia
  • Internship
  • EECS